This pattern includes 12 pages of instructions with historical tips, and 2 pattern sheets. It is printed on bond paper, and enclosed in a reclosable plastic bag.

All sizes included, 2 – 30; waist: 17” – 55”,
hips: 27” – 63”.

Turkish trousers, Bloomers, knickerbockers, and divided skirts are all names for what was basically the same garment with a few variations. It was also a part of what was called a freedom dress, rational dress, and health dress. As physical exercise became fashionable for women, it became a component in bicycling, mountaineering, swimming, and gymnastic wear. They were also a favored garment at masked balls and theatre performance outfits. They even were used in evening gowns by the most daring ladies.


The pattern has several variations. The trousers may be made in the wide Turkish style or a narrower width, from below-knee to ankle length. The leg ends may be enclosed in a cuff, confined with elastic, or left open at the bottom.

No. 1850-3
Perfect for Reform Dress or Sports Wear.
These trousers may be made in the wide Turkish style or a narrower width, from below-knee to ankle length. The leg ends may be enclosed in a cuff, confined with elastic, or left open at the bottom.

$15.00

1850 – 1900 Bloomers, Turkish Trousers, or Knickerbockers Pattern

The Mantua-Maker