The Mantua-Maker

Second is the short hooped petticoat or panniers. It is approximately 34" wide at the bottom of the oval.  It is more structured, with two hoops on each side (approx. 10” shelf). One such hooped petticoat was made of red, blue, and white plaid cotton. These would be worn for traveling, light entertaining, or around 1720 - 1740 – before the wide fashions appeared.

This pattern includes 4 pages of instructions with historical tips, and 1 pattern sheet. It is printed on bond paper, and enclosed in a white paper envelope.

All sizes Petite – X-Large are included.

No. 1700-2
Patterns for both types:
 1) small and simple. 

2) mid sized hoops.
 The larger is approximately 34" wide at the bottom of the oval. 
It is more structured, with two hoops.

$8.00

Almost every woman wore a hooped petticoat during most of this period, even servants and farm women, if complaints and commentary from contemporary sources can be trusted. The Victorians renamed them panniers, from the French word "paniers" - a basket - but in England the women who wore them called them false hips or improvers. Fashion called them hooped petticoats.

This pattern contains pattern pieces for two fairly simple panniers. First, a simple, single false hip based on an American model, which was made of pale colored canvas. They are fairly narrow (approx. 5” shelf on each side), and would be worn for light work or casual wear.  It is approximately 20" across the widest part of the oval.  This is a very simple, single hoop pannier.

1720 - 1780 Hooped Petticoats Pattern