Georgian Patterns



 
1740 - 1780
Robe a la Francaise
$25.00


At the time, this flowing, pleated back style of dress was called “robe à la Française” or a sack dress. Later it became known as a Watteau gown, after the painter who often portrayed his female subjects wearing it.

I give instructions for both the open and closed skirts, in the English or French styles. The skirt width is determined by the shelf width of the hooped petticoat it is to be worn over. It is set up for a 12” panniers shelf, which is easily changed. A period width adjusting technique is included.

This pattern includes 14 pages of instructions with historical tips, and 7 pattern sheets. It is printed on bond paper, and enclosed in a white paper envelope.

All sizes Petite – X-large are included.


No. 1700-7
Watteau back gown.
Open or closed skirt.
Three options of bodice closures.
English (sofa) or French (soft pleats) styles.
Adjustable to different panniers.
Decoration and variation ideas included.

 
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1740 - 1780
Oblong Petticoats
$9.00


No. 1700-4
Designed to cover panniers.
Individually adjusted for panniers width.
Wide or narrow versions available.
French (gathered & flowing) or English (flat panels) styles.
Decoration ideas included.
Georgian Sewing Pattern / Wide Skirt / Oblong Petticoats, Multi Size Pattern, 1700-4
The over petticoat served as an outer garment as well as underwear. It cushioned the hoops so the frame did not show. Last year's outermost petticoat often became part of this year's underwear.

The Victorians renamed them panniers, but the women who wore them called them false hips, improvers, or hooped petticoats. Almost everyone female wore a hooped petticoat during much of this period, even servants and farm women, if complaints and commentary from contemporary sources can be trusted. The over petticoat was the first layer over the panniers, followed possibly by an outer petticoat of the same structure, and by an open or closed robe.

This pattern contains directions for both the soft, sweeping French style, and for the straight English style of petticoats. The skirt width is determined by the shelf width of the hooped petticoat it is to be worn over. It is set up for a 12" panniers shelf. A period width adjusting technique is included.

It includes 6 pages of instructions with historical tips, and 2 pattern sheets. It is printed on bond paper, and enclosed in a white paper envelope. All sizes Petite – X-Large are included.
 
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1740 - 1820
Court Hooped Petticoats Pattern
$9.00


No. 1700-3
Approx. 17" shelf on each side.
French or English styles.
Construction variations
 included.
The Victorians renamed them panniers, from the French word “paniers” - a basket - but in England the women who wore them called them false hips or improvers. Fashion called them hooped petticoats.

The wide panniers were shaped differently in England than they were in France. In England they straight, side to side, top to bottom – the fashionable lady looked like she was sitting in a sofa. French hoops were kidney shaped, and gradually got wider and rounder toward the bottom, making the profile softer. Most of this shaping was caused by ribbons tied inside the petticoat.

This pattern contains pattern pieces for what I am calling “Court” hoops, which would be high fashion from 1740 - 1755, or court wear afterward. It has an approximately 17” wide shelf on each side. Choose from the straight, hard edged English style or the softer, rounder French style.

This pattern includes 4 pages of instructions with historical tips, and 2 pattern sheets. It is printed on bond paper, and enclosed in a white paper envelope.

All sizes Petite – X-Large are included.


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1720 - 1780
   Hooped Petticoats Pattern
   $8.00
 
No. 1700-2
Patterns for both types:
 1) small and simple.           2) mid sized hoops.
 

The larger is approximately 34" wide at the bottom of the oval. 
It is more structured, with two hoops.
 
Almost every woman wore a hooped petticoat during most of this period, even servants and farm women, if complaints and commentary from contemporary sources can be trusted. The Victorians renamed them panniers, from the French word "paniers" - a basket - but in England the women who wore them called them false hips or improvers. Fashion called them hooped petticoats.

This pattern contains pattern pieces for two fairly simple panniers. First, a simple, single false hip based on an American model, which was made of pale colored canvas. They are fairly narrow (approx. 5” shelf on each side), and would be worn for light work or casual wear.  It is approximately 20" across the widest part of the oval.  This is a very simple, single hoop pannier.

Second is the short hooped petticoat or panniers. It is approximately 34" wide at the bottom of the oval.  It is more structured, with two hoops on each side (approx. 10” shelf). One such hooped petticoat was made of red, blue, and white plaid cotton. These would be worn for traveling, light entertaining, or around 1720 - 1740 – before the wide fashions appeared.

This pattern includes 4 pages of instructions with historical tips, and 1 pattern sheet. It is printed on bond paper, and enclosed in a white paper envelope.

All sizes Petite – X-Large are included.
 
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No. 1700-6
The original Georgian pocket.
Carry your keys, coins, and cards in style.


Pockets like these were worn under the dress and outer petticoat throughout the 1700's. They were made of sturdy material, but embroidered quite elegantly, even though no one but the lady (and her maid) ever saw them.

This pattern includes two pages of instructions and one small pattern sheet.

One size fits all.
1700's Pocket Pattern
  $1.50
 


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1750 - 1900 
Fingerless Mittens Pattern
$3.00
 
No. 1800-5
 

Late Georgian, Regency, and Victorian Mitts pattern. 

Early in this period, gloves and light mittens were worn to keep the arms and hands protected from the sun. White skin was very fashionable, very upper class. A fingerless mitten of the type in this pattern would be worn in order to be fashionable, while having access to the free use of the fingers.

This pattern includes 3 pages of instructions with historical tips, and 1 pattern sheet. It is printed on bond paper, and enclosed in a resealable plastic envelope.

All sizes Petite – X-large are included. Length: 10.5" – 12"

Included are options for the simple Victorian-style mittens, and for the flap used in earlier years. They can be made short or long.

 


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1550 - 1840
Under Petticoats
Pamphlet
$1.75
 
No. 1700-5
No Pattern sheet included; Instructions only.

This seven page brochure contains directions for the simple under petticoat, with or without a flounce or a colored band, for a quilted petticoat, and for the more voluminous middle layer petticoat.

Instructions for sizes Petite – Full are included. (Waist measurements 20” - 50”, hip measurements 30” - 60” – but since this is a drawstring garment, the measurements are very forgiving.)
http://www.mantua-maker.com/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/1700-5-underskirt.jpg

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1600 - 1840 
Chemise
Pattern
$8.00

No. 1800-1
The bottom layer.
Wear it under your stays to protect the corset from sweat and body oils.
Perfume was an essential part of this garment's existence. The laundress washed underclothing in herbs and scents, partly because clothing was not washed very often (and when it was, wood ash, mud, or dung might be used as "cleansers"), and partly because the wearer did not bathe very often. After 1700, soap and boiling water became the cleaning method of choice, but her underwear was still washed more frequently than she was.

This pattern includes 4 pages of instructions with historical tips, and 2 pattern sheets. It is printed on bond paper, and enclosed in a white paper envelope.

All sizes Petite – X-large are included.
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1720 - 1790
Georgian Stays
$9.00
 

No. 1700-1
Needed for the true Georgian silhouette.
Long corset for bust enhancement
and abdomen reduction.
Option of fully boned or half boned.
Removable busk (not included).
To create the true Georgian silhouette, you need a firm pair of stays. This long corset is helpful with bust enhancement and abdomen reduction, and includes fully-boned or half-boned options. The removable busk is not included, but is available in another listing.

The stays of this period were heavily boned to create the fashionable conical shape. When lightly boned (known as half boned), they were used for casual, leisure wear, and might be called corsets; unboned, they were worn privately, or when privately entertaining, and were called jumps.

This pattern includes 11 pages of instructions with historical tips, and 2 pattern sheets. They are printed on bond paper, and enclosed in a reclosable plastic bag.

All sizes 2 – 24 are included.

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No. 1700-8
14" long Hardwood Corset/Stays Busk
 with Information Sheet
Keeps the front of the corset upright & stiff

Fits patterns #1500-4, #1700-1 & #1810-3

$9.00





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